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Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's birthday

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the founding father of Bangladesh, was born on March 17, 1920, in Tungipara, a village in British India (now Bangladesh).

May 21, 23By Anwar Pervez
Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's birthday

About Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's birthday

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the founding father of Bangladesh, was born on March 17, 1920, in Tungipara, a village in British India (now Bangladesh). His birthday is widely celebrated in Bangladesh as a national holiday known as "Mujib Barsha" or "Mujib Borsho." The day is marked by various events and programs to honor Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's contributions to the country's independence and his leadership in shaping Bangladesh as a sovereign nation. On his birthday, special tributes are paid, including speeches, cultural performances, exhibitions, and discussions on his life and achievements. It is a day to remember his vision, principles, and his commitment to the welfare and progress of Bangladesh.



History of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, often referred to as Bangabandhu (Friend of Bengal), was a prominent political leader and the founding father of Bangladesh. He played a vital role in the country's struggle for independence and served as its first President and later Prime Minister.


Born on March 17, 1920, in Tungipara, a village in British India (now Bangladesh), Sheikh Mujibur Rahman grew up in a politically conscious environment. He became involved in the All India Muslim Students Federation during his college years and later joined the Muslim League, advocating for the rights of the Bengali Muslim population.


Following the partition of India in 1947, Rahman became a staunch supporter of East Pakistan's autonomy within the newly formed country of Pakistan. He co-founded the Awami Muslim League, which later evolved into the Awami League, a political party that championed the rights of Bengalis in East Pakistan.


Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, Rahman emerged as a prominent leader, advocating for greater autonomy and rights for the people of East Pakistan, who felt marginalized by the central government in West Pakistan. His charismatic leadership and impassioned speeches resonated with the Bengali population, earning him immense popularity.


In 1970, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's Awami League secured a landslide victory in the general elections of Pakistan, winning a majority of seats in East Pakistan. However, the ruling elite in West Pakistan refused to transfer power to Rahman, triggering widespread protests and civil unrest.


On March 26, 1971, the Pakistani military launched a brutal crackdown in East Pakistan, leading to the Bangladesh Liberation War. Sheikh Mujibur Rahman was arrested and imprisoned in West Pakistan while the struggle for independence raged on.


After nine months of intense fighting, Bangladesh achieved independence on December 16, 1971. Rahman was released from prison and returned to Bangladesh, where he was hailed as a national hero.


In January 1972, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman became the Prime Minister of Bangladesh, leading the country's reconstruction and rebuilding efforts. He focused on rehabilitating refugees, rebuilding the war-torn nation, and implementing social and economic reforms.


Rahman's leadership style and policies emphasized socialism, secularism, and the empowerment of the poor and marginalized. He played a pivotal role in drafting Bangladesh's constitution, which enshrined principles of democracy, socialism, and secularism.


Tragically, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's tenure as the leader of Bangladesh was cut short. On August 15, 1975, he and most of his family members were assassinated in a military coup.


Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's legacy remains deeply ingrained in the history and identity of Bangladesh. He is revered as the father of the nation and is remembered for his unwavering dedication to the rights and aspirations of the Bengali people. His vision and leadership laid the foundation for the independent nation of Bangladesh.